INTERDISCIPLINARY ELECTIVE

Registration open from March 25 until April 8, 2024

Short Facts
  • Date: November 8 until November 23, 2024
  • Student Workload: 5 ECTS
  • Format: On-campus, online, mixed
  • Language: English
  • Participants: Students of various Bachelor programs at MCI
  • Prior knowledge: No prior knowledge in the specific topic required

EXPLORE  I  EXCHANGE  I  EVOLVE

 

As a student of MCI I The Entrepreneurial School®, you not only enjoy a profound study program in your relevant discipline, you also have the unique opportunity to participate in one of our interdisciplinary electives from a wide range of inspiring topics.Our multidisciplinary curricula allow you to "look beyond" your own study program and work together with students from other disciplines. Prepare yourself for an educational adventure that will transform your perspective and ignite your intellectual curiosity!

 

Contact
                      

 

If you have any questions about the electives, please contact the office management of your study program.

 

How to choose your elective

 

1

1

Overview

Get an overview of the electives and their contents

 

2

2

Selection

Find your four favorite electives from the total offer

 

3

3

Prioritization

Prioritize your four electives on the registration site

 

4

4

Assignment

We will assign you to one of your four electives

 

5

5

Notification

You will receive an email with the final allocation

Choose your elective, work together, broaden your horizon.

 

Entrepreneurship & Innovation

Why choose this course?

This course offers the opportunity to acquire in-depth, practical knowledge on family business, regardless of whether you are a student studying business administration or a non-specialist student, and irrespective of whether you come from a family business background or not.

The special practical relevance is achieved through a unique network of family businesses that has evolved at the MCI Family Business Center. Some of these businesses will be visited during our field trip. Family firm knowledge opens up a variety of career opportunities for graduates, since family firms are the dominant corporate form worldwide.

Who is your lecturer?

Anita Zehrer1

 

Prof. Anita Zehrer graduated from Innsbruck University, Austria with a PhD in Social Sciences and received her post-doctoral lecturing qualification at the Catholic University of Eichstaett-Ingolstadt, Germany. Currently she is Professor and Head of the Family Business Center as well as Head of Research (Management & Society) at the MCI The Entrepreneurial School ®. Additionally, she works as both, Certified Business Coach and Mediator.

Language

English

Student workload

5 ECTS (including 1-2 ECTS asynchronous self-study)

Assessment

The final grade comprises the following two parts:

  • Semester-accompanying performance (SAP) 20%: oral participation, group works, in-class assignments, etc.
  • Learning outcome diary 30%: reflection on each day of course (synchronous as well as asynchronous sessions), key findings and learnings 200 words per day
  • Final presentation 50%: group presentation on assigned topic including insights from the field trip

Mode

On-Campus: Monday till Friday during the day | synchronous (+ further teaching units asynchronous)

Date

November 11 – 22, 2024

Contents

  • Introduction to family business: definition, facts and figures, economic perspective, advantages and disadvantages, underlying theories and concepts
  • Ownership succession management: types of ownership, strategic planning, success factors of succession, the role of key non-family employees, managing transition, key challenges of succession process, nepotism, gender equality, generational challenges, success and failure
  • Family business governance: structures and agreements, family versus business strategy, family constitution, the role of advisory boards, family councils and family meetings
  • Internationalization and growth of family firms: growth strategies, internationalization theories (stage theory, Uppsala model, etc.), entry modes of internationalization
  • Coping with uncertainty and risk: definition of uncertainty and risk, VUCA, Covid-19 pandemic, global risk landscape, levels of resilience, theory of adaptive cycles,
  • Innovation in family firms: forms of innovation, antecedents, measurements, tradition versus innovation paradigm
  • Apart from in-class activities we will visit family businesses in the Tirol from different industries and gain insights into their daily business. This allows students to have a one-on-one discussion on all topics covered with family firm entrepreneurs.

Learning Goals 

The course will explore the three systems of a family business, the family system, the business system and the ownership system and their interactions – functional and dysfunctional. Participants will be introduced to the basic issues of family business, and guided through the structures and procedures for successful family enterprises.

Upon completion of this elective course, students will be able to:

  • appreciate the characteristics and challenges of family businesses and their dynamics
  • understand leadership succession of family businesses and the challenges of next generation leaders
  • learn about governance mechanisms in family businesses
  • understand internationalization and growth strategies of family firms
  • learn coping mechanisms in case of uncertainty and risk in family firms
  • learn about the innovation–tradition paradigm in family firms
 

 

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Remember, you have to choose a total of four electives!

Why choose this course?

This course offers a deep dive into social entrepreneurship, empowering students to address societal and environmental challenges innovatively. It combines theoretical knowledge with practical experience, including ideation, development, and pitching of social enterprises. Students will explore various business models, engage in creative problem-solving, and prepare to become effective social entrepreneurs. The course is ideal for those seeking to make a positive impact in sustainable ways, while learning from real-world case studies and lots of experience.

Who is your lecturer?

 

SalbornEtienne 211949Bytes1

Etienne Salborn is a MCI Alumni, changemaker-maker and social entrepreneur. He founded SINA (Social Innovation Academy), enabling disadvantaged youth and refugee communities in Africa to unleash their potentials and become social entrepreneurs. SINA self-organized and freesponsible learning spaces distribute leadership and empower the youth to become the change they want to see.

Language

English

Student workload

5 ECTS (including 1-2 ECTS asynchronous self-study)

Assessment

  • Semester-accompanying performance (SAP): oral participation, group works, presentations, in-class assignments, etc.
  • Final exam: group case-study discussion on a given topic

Mode

Mixed: 2 weekends on-campus (Friday afternoon + Saturday) + 1 weekend online | synchronous (+ further teaching units asynchronous)

Date

November 8 & 9, 2024
November 15 & 16, 2024
November 22 & 23, 2024

Contents

  • Introduction to Social Entrepreneurship: Definitions, history, and case studies including SINA (Social Innovation Academy) and its journey starting at MCI.
  • Experiential learning and hands-on Idea to Impact Process: Creative ideation, problem identification, social business models, and customer discovery.
  • Bringing Social Enterprises to Life: Scaling strategies, funding, rapid prototyping and demo day with pitching to an external panel.
  • Simulations, activities coupled with theory, debates, presentations in a facilitation style rather than a traditional lecture.

Learning Goals 

  • Understand social entrepreneurship, its power for positive change and distinguish it from traditional business models.
  • Develop and pitch ideas for social enterprises addressing environmental and societal issues.
  • Analyze various business models and apply associative thinking for social entrepreneurship.
  • Gain insights into social entrepreneurship, social business, and corporate social responsibility.
  • Develop critical and creative thinking skills to address social and environmental challenges.
 

 

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Remember, you have to choose a total of four electives!

Why choose this course?

Having a brilliant business idea is just the beginning; the key to success lies in your ability to effectively sell that idea. Launching a startup is a milestone, but only a select few achieve real success. Your journey hinges on effective communication, the perception of investors, and the trust within your innovative team. Mastering the art of public speaking and interview skills empowers you to sway your audience. The ability to discern honesty builds a foundation of trust for your innovative venture. Meanwhile, mastering your voice becomes the instrumental tool in persuading potential investors. This course is your gateway to acquiring these tactical entrepreneurship and innovation skills, strategically equipping you for the dynamic journey of business success.

Who is your lecturer?

 

 Yevgen Bogodistov 

Yevgen Bogodistov is an enthusiastic researcher, teacher, and practitioner with a diverse focus. Having ascended to the role of Chief Operating Officer in a Ukrainian mid-sized enterprise, Yevgen has forged a successful career as a practitioner. He also served as a project coordinator at the Konrad-Adenauer Foundation in Kyiv, orchestrating numerous seminars dedicated to communication, creativity, and value-driven behaviour.

Language

English

Student workload

5 ECTS (including 1-2 ECTS asynchronous self-study)

Assessment

Assignment 1: Mastering Presentation Skills – Apply trained presenting and voice tools learned in class to deliver a compelling video presentation. 2-3 minute video, 40%.

Assignment 2: Analysing Deceptive Public Speaking – Apply lie detection principles to analyse a video of a public speaker displaying potential deceptive behaviour. Written assignment, about 1500 words, 60%.

Mode

Mixed: 2 weekends on-campus (Friday afternoon + Saturday) + 1 weekend online | synchronous (+ further teaching units asynchronous)

Date

November 8 & 9, 2024
November 15 & 16, 2024
November 22 & 23, 2024

Contents

In this course, Yevgen aims to blend his practical expertise and research insights seamlessly. His goal is to provide students with contemporary knowledge and skills essential for emerging entrepreneurs and intrapreneurs—individuals championing their ideas within their respective organisations.

  • Lie Detection – utilize psychological tools for effective deception detection.
  • Voice Mastery – develop voice skills by mastering pitch, depth, pace, and power.
  • Camera-Ready Interviews – navigate interviews with confidence, learning how to handle tough questions from reporters.

Stress Reduction in Public Speaking – learn strategies to reduce stress and enhance composure during public speaking engagements.

Learning Goals

Upon completion of this elective course, students will be able to:

  • Employ psychological tools for accurate lie detection in various contexts.
  • Command attention with a refined voice, mastering pitch, depth, pace, and power.
  • Navigate media interviews confidently, avoiding pitfalls and presenting a polished image.
  • Employ stress reduction techniques to enhance composure during public presentations.

(if time and desire permit) Apply strategies to prevent conflicts and enhance communication efficacy, ensuring smoother interactions in professional settings.

 

 

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Remember, you have to choose a total of four electives!

Why choose this course?

Starting a company is a serious endeavor under uncertainty and requires sacrifices to go around—so why not minimize the risk?

That's the goal of this course, which is designed for students of all experience levels who are interested in starting an own business.

Rather than inventing new concepts, this course assembles all the tools that have already established track records of success in entrepreneurial practice. It integrates them together in an easy to access and prescriptive road map to get your business up.

Thus, if you ever thought about turning an idea into a business but did not know where to start, this course gives you a clear structure.
As a cherry on top, you will work with some of the latest AI-tools which serve as co-pilot to deliver results faster, but also to sharpen your instinct and engage your creativity.

Who is your lecturer?  

 
Christian Klusmann

As Head of Startup Coaching, Christian Klusmann and his team support approx. 300 startups at digitalHUB Aachen on entrepreneurial challenges, such as team building, business models and financing. During his studies of industrial engineering at RWTH, he founded an (unsuccessful) e-learning startup himself.

Since his doctorate at the University of Kassel, he has worked as an external lecturer to pass on his practical entrepreneurial knowledge.

Language

English

Student workload

5 ECTS (including 1-2 ECTS asynchronous self-study)

Assessment

quiz

+ individual assignment regarding the venture creation process (framework)

+ group assignment regarding your new venture (pitch)

Mode

Mixed: 2 weekends on-campus (Friday afternoon + Saturday) + 1 weekend online | synchronous (+ further teaching units asynchronous)

Date

November 8 & 9, 2024
November 15 & 16, 2024
November 22 & 23, 2024

Contents

This course is designed for (future) entrepreneurs who want to build great ventures. For more than a decade, methods such as Lean Startup or Effectuation, have been part of the canon for founders around the world. However, with the rise of AI, the process of venture creation becomes faster, cheaper, and more efficiently.

For this reason, the course AI-Driven Entrepreneurship:

  • combines existing methods and unites them in a step-by-step framework for venture creation.
  • allows students to track their progress of venture creation in the illustrated framework.
  • gives a comprehensive introduction to selected AI-tools which can help to shorten or complete the respective steps in the venture creation process more quickly.
  • guides students through the framework and the use of AI-tools by means of lectures and curated videos.
  • helps students to think entrepreneurially and is fun.

Learning Goals 

Upon completion of this elective course, students will be able to:

  • identify and evaluate new venture opportunities to determine their strengths, weaknesses, and overall business potential.
  • describe the new venture creation process — including the activities, challenges, and opportunities involved.
  • innovate, persevere, and create a product or service, people want
  • use selected state-of-the-art AI-tools and improve their prompting skills

During this course, students will also:

  • develop teamwork skills, ownership and leadership skills, due to the group work
  • improve their oral and written communication skills (e.g. by learning how to develop a compelling value proposition statement, an in-depth industry analysis, and/or a persuasive business pitch)
 

 

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Remember, you have to choose a total of four electives!

Why choose this course?

This elective transforms your approach to change, enhancing your entrepreneurial and future-thinking skills. You will develop futures literacy through diverse tools and techniques, increasing your resilience in complex and rapidly changing environments. Its interactive, student-centered nature demands your engagement and openness to new ideas. You will learn to shape, not just anticipate, the future, by honing your critical, creative, and strategic thinking. Completing this course equips you to be a forward-thinking pioneer, ready to create positive world change with innovative solutions.

Optional: Be a part of a futures research project of the UNESCO Chair in Futures Capability for Innovation and Entrepreneurship. Details will follow in the course.

Who is your lecturer?

 

Antje Bierwisch

Antje Bierwisch: 20+ years in applied futures research, innovation management, and entrepreneurship, expert in futures thinking, creativity, certified LEGO Serious Play facilitator, chairholder of UNESCO Chair in Futures Capability for Innovation & Entrepreneurship

 Juliana Pattermann

Juliana Pattermann: background in business education and business English, research and teaching activities focused on futures studies (especially futures literacy) and learning

Language

English

Student workload

5 ECTS (including 1-2 ECTS asynchronous self-study)

Assessment

  • Written assignment, individual reflection paper
  • Individual assignments and quizzes on futures thinking, creativity, and innovation concepts and methods related to asynchronous self-study lectures

Mode

Online: 2 evenings each week + Friday afternoon each week | synchronous (+ further teaching units asynchronous)

Date

November 11 – 22, 2024

Contents

  • Introduction to Futures Thinking, Creativity, and Innovation: Concepts, relevance, and practical application
  • Futures Thinking Methods: Frameworks and tools to explore and create alternative futures, e.g. trend canvas, futures persona, futures triangle, scenarios etc.
  • Creative Thinking Techniques: Methods and tools to generate, evaluate and improve ideas, e.g. brainstorming, Superhero, SCAMPER, LEGO serious play etc.
  • Apply futures thinking and creativity methods/techniques to various topics and challenges
  • Creativity and Futures Thinking in the context of future skills & life-long learning

Learning Goals 

Upon completion of this elective course, students will be able to:

  • think critically, creatively, and strategically about the future using their newly gained and developed skills and mindset
  • understand the concepts and principles of futures thinking, creativity, and innovation
  • select, apply, and evaluate futures thinking and creativity tools to innovation and foster sustainable entrepreneurial decision-making
  • boost imagination, adaptability, and innovation in the face of change
  • enhance resilience in navigating evolving landscapes
  • communicate, collaborate, and exchange ideas to shape the future recognize their role as active change agents
 

 

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Remember, you have to choose a total of four electives!

Why choose this course?

The ability to make prudent economic and financial decisions is a crucial skill for successful entrepreneurs and self-reliant citizens alike. In the elective "Principles of Entrepreneurial and Personal Finance", students will learn how to effectively manage personal finances and develop key entrepreneurial financial skills. The course covers essential topics like budgeting, investing, and retirement planning, while also delving into business-focused areas such as cash flow management, start-up funding, and investor relations. This holistic approach equips students with the knowledge and tools necessary for sound financial decision-making in both their personal lives and entrepreneurial ventures.

Who is your lecturer?

 

Michael Razen

Michael Razen is a Professor of Finance and Head of MCI’s Business & Management Department. In his research, he investigates how we can improve our economic and financial decision-making.  Aside from his academic teaching, Michael has also developed the financial education program “FiT – Financial Training” and currently heads the Scientific Committee of the National Financial Literacy Strategy for Austria.

 Michael Rauhofer

Michael Rauhofer has been working as general manager in the industry, establishing Austria’s largest incubator for high tech start-ups and works now in the field of Company pension schemes and financial advisory services for SMEs, private clients and institutional investors. He earned his degrees at TU Vienna, Donau University Krems and at Harvard Business School. Michael also teaches Entrepreneurship at MCI.

Florian Blosl

 Florian Blösl is a research & teaching assistant at MCI and an external PhD student at Bauhaus-Universität Weimar, focusing on the effects of proactive decision-making in entrepreneurship and finance. With a background in banking and wealth management, his professional experience has significantly influenced his academic research.

Language

English

Student workload

5 ECTS (including 1-2 ECTS asynchronous self-study)

Assessment

Quizzes and group presentations

Mode

On-Campus: Monday till Friday during the day | synchronous (+ further teaching units asynchronous)

Date

November 11 – 22, 2024

Contents

  • Introduction to economics and finance
  • Risk and time value of money
  • The psychology of economic and financial decision-making
  • Personal financial management (budgeting, saving and investing, debt management, retirement planning, taxes)
  • Managing receivables, payables, and cash-flows
  • Understanding balance sheets and income statements
  • Start-up funding and relations with investors and creditors/banks

Learning Goals 

Upon completion of this elective course, students will:

  • Be familiar with the basic principles of economics and finance
  • Understand the broader contexts and relevant factors surrounding financial decisions
  • Understand risk and how it can be managed
  • Be able to make reflective and informed economic and financial decisions in personal and entrepreneurial contexts
  • Understand how to calculate and manage cash flows
  • Be able to conceptualize their business ideas and pitch them to potential investors
 

 

REGISTER HERE 

Remember, you have to choose a total of four electives!

Why choose this course?

  • Embrace new methods to develop creativity and improvisation skills through hands-on experience
  • Develop crucial 21st-century skills for shaping and contribution to the future, i.e. navigate future complexity and uncertainty with a positive mindset
  • Step out of your comfort zone for personal growth. Learn to constructively handle failures and learn from it
  • Learning happens through engagement – therefore we want you to have fun during this course and act together with a group of like-minded people
  • Optional: Be a spectator and/or participant in an improvisation theatre performance

Who is your lecturer?

 

Martina Kohlberger

 

Martina Kohlberger: extensive practical experience in people  development, researcher and lecturer, certified systemic coach, theatre enthusiast

Oliver Som

 

Oliver Som: 20+ years in applied innovation & future research, expertise in creativity and agile project management, jazz musician and composer

 

Language

English

Student workload

5 ECTS (including 1-2 ECTS asynchronous self-study)

Assessment

  • Online quizzes on asynchronous self-study mini lectures (totaling to 40%)
  • Individual reflection paper based on diary (60%)

Mode

 

Mixed: 2 weekends on-campus (Friday afternoon + Saturday) + 1 weekend online | synchronous (+ further teaching units asynchronous)

Date

November 8 & 9, 2024
November 15 & 16, 2024
November 22 & 23, 2024

Contents

  • Develop improvisational skills for effective use in business contexts
  • Foster creativity as a trainable capability for problem-solving and decision-making
  • Enhance communication proficiency to adopt a flexible approach to varying situations
  • Cultivate collaborative skills using a strength-based approach
  • Promote personality development by building confidence with uncertainty
  • Didactics: Interactive and highly collaborative learning settings focusing on group activities, improvisation-theatre-like settings, methods of positive psychology, mini-lectures for self-learning

Learning Goals 

Upon completion of this elective course, students will be able to:

  • Explore, apply and reflect on exercises and training methods to boost creativity and improvisation skills
  • Build on and adjust their personal behaviours and interactions, recognizing the impact on group dynamics
  • Implement double-loop learning processes for sustainable capability development
  • Individually reflect on their emotions, contributions and learning path during the course
  • Cognitively understand concepts of creativity, theories of communication, positive psychology, futures literacy, and self-leadership
 

 

REGISTER HERE 

Remember, you have to choose a total of four electives!

Why choose this course?

  • The course allows students to develop skills in project oriented cooperation between emerging experts from different fields of study.
  • Students will gain valuable experience in project development. Including task management and working under time restraints, in a fasted paced environment.
  • Students will be in an excellent position to later assess and spearhead digital innovations, making them a valuable assent to any organization.

Who is your lecturer?

 

Alexander Jahn

Alexander Jahn studied biotechnology in Berlin and Busan, pharmacy in Seoul and worked as a senior researcher as well as a lecturer in Korea. He was active in FabLabs, is a proponent of interdisciplinarity, avid user of CAD and CAM. His research focuses mostly on bioprocess engineering in the area of microalgae and cell culture

Language

English

Student workload

5 ECTS

Assessment

Presentation

Mode

 

Online: 2 evenings each week + Friday afternoon each week | synchronous (+ further teaching units asynchronous)

Date

November 11 – 22, 2024

Contents

  • Students from various background will collaborate in small groups and use their unique expertise in this project driven class.
  • Class will teach innovation project development on example of a practical contest entry for a digital innovation challenge in the area of Pharmaceutical-, Health- and Food-Industry.
  • Students will engage in hands-on learning experiences, with the help of a few case studies followed by a collaborative project.
  • Students will explore the intersection of technology, business, and innovation, by developing their own digital innovation project.
  • The course will simulate real-world scenarios faced by industries leveraging digital technologies.

Learning Goals 

Upon completion of this elective course, students will be able to:

  • Understand the impact digital technologies can have in the Pharmaceutical-, Health- and Food-Industry.
  • Critically analyze ideas and project proposals related to digital innovation in various industries.
  • Leverage their newfound understanding of project proposals to develop their own ideas into projects.
  • Identify common challenges in project development and formulate plans accordingly.
  • Apply learned project management principles in other projects.
 

 

REGISTER HERE 

Remember, you have to choose a total of four electives!

Why choose this course?

Choosing this elective will provide you with insight in two topics:

  • You will learn about the specific aspects of the human body moving in a sports context. A lot of this knowledge can be applied to your own routines and will help in better understanding sports and performance.
  • You will see fascinating data, directly measured on the human body. And you will learn how to analyze the data to improve the performance of athletes and the design of sports products.

Who is your lecturer?

 

 Bernhard Hollaus

Bernhard Hollaus is leading the research cluster health technologies at MCI and serves as professor in sports technologies. Before that, Bernhard was contributing to the development of study programs in mechatronics, medical and sports technologies. He also led several research projects with many partner institutions. Prior to joining MCI, Bernhard did his studies in electronics and sport science at Technikum Wien and University of Innsbruck.

 Jasper Volmer

Jasper Volmer, with a bachelor's in architecture & Structural Engineering and a master's in mechanical engineering from the University of Technology Eindhoven, brings valuable expertise. Previously a FLS Engineer Drive Laser and a Scientist at Philips Research, he now contributes to MCI. Starting as a project member in the Mechatronics Department, he transitioned in 2023 to become a Teaching & Research Assistant, specializing in Sports Technology within the Medical Technologies Department

Language

English

Student workload

5 ECTS (including 1-2 ECTS asynchronous self-study)

Assessment

Project Work

Mode 

Online: 2 evenings each week + Friday afternoon each week | synchronous (+ further teaching units asynchronous)

Date

November 11 – 22, 2024

Contents

  • Introduction to determinants of sports performance, the sports equipment market and the challenges of developing products for sports
  • Introduction to the specificity of human movement, Introduction to measurement principles, data acquisition technologies of human movement data. Such as IMU, Force plates, Pressure insoles, Videoanalysis and EMG.
  • Introduction to data analysis of biosignals and movement data
  • Application of these methods to compare different sport products and sports techniques

Learning Goals 

Upon completion of this elective course, students will be able to:

  • Understand the basic principles of human movement
  • Understand the difference between mechanics and biomechanics
  • Identify relevant movements and functions for sports performance
  • Understand the principles used to measure human movement and interpret the measurement data
  • Choose appropriate methods to analyze human movement
  • Understand how to transform the measurement results into adaptations of training or concepts of sports products
  • Understand the underlying principles of development of sports products
 

 

REGISTER HERE 

Remember, you have to choose a total of four electives!

Why choose this course?

Choosing this elective will provide you with insight in two topics: You will receive an introduction to the sector of health technology, which is a fast-growing market in developed countries, with the growth of the industry being further driven by the aging of the society.

On the other hand, the course is designed as a hands-on workshop where you will have the opportunity to design and manufacture a wearable device yourself. This includes building a sensor circuit, design and additive manufacturing of the mechanical housing and programming the software. No prior technical skills are required for this course, but it is designed as an introductory course which allows to get to know some basic skills used in engineering.

Therefore, this course provides a great opportunity to create digitized medical device hardware and software, even without prior technical skills, leveraging a basic understanding of health technology.

Who is your lecturer?

 

 Daniel Sieber

Daniel Sieber, Professor and Head of Department for Medical, Health & Sport Technologies, has 15 years of experience in the medical device industry, and served as an Executive Research & Development Manager and Scientific Director. Since 2022, he leads the MedTech department, contributing to both teaching and research in his domain.

 Yeongmi Kim

Yeongmi Kim is currently a professor in the department of Medical & Health Technology, MCI. Her principal research interests are sensory-motor rehabilitation, assistive technology, medical robotics, human computer interaction, and haptic feedback interfaces.  She obtained her PhD in Mechatronics from GIST in 2010 and worked as a postdoctoral Researcher, research associate at ETH Zurich at the Rehabilitation Engineering Lab, and University of Sheffield. In 2015 she joined MCI as a Lecturer; she became a professor in 2018.  

Eva Graf

Eva Graf is Senior Lecturer at the department of Medical & Health Technologies at MCI. Eva has a background in mechanical engineering and graduated from Technical University of Munich. Prior to joining MCI, she worked as a project engineer in the development of minimally invasive medical devices with a focus on the early development stages of new products.

Language

English

Student workload

5 ECTS (including 1-2 ECTS asynchronous self-study)

Assessment

Project Work

Mode

 

On-Campus: Monday till Friday during the day | synchronous (+ further teaching units asynchronous)

Date

November 11 – 22, 2024

Contents

  • Introduction to the health technology sector, the basics of the development process for medical devices and regulatory conditions in the medical device sector
  • Selection of a suitable sensor suitable for the parameter measured by the wearable device, design of the electronic circuit to use the sensor in the wearable and assembly of the circuit
  • Introduction to additive manufacturing (3D printing) methods and design of part using computer-aided design software. 3D design of the housing of the wearable and printing the prototype

Learning Goals 

Upon completion of this elective course, students will be able to:

  • Understand the role of the health technology sector
  • Describe the development and regulatory processes in the medical device sector and differences to other industries
  • Create a sensor circuit which can be used to measure parameters in a wearable device
  • Design a mechanical part that is suitable for additive manufacturing and create a prototype of the housing
  • Understand the underlying logic of programs and develop an Android App interfacing with the prototype
 

 

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Remember, you have to choose a total of four electives!

Why choose this course?

In a knowledge-based and technology-driven economy, Intellectual Property (IP) holds paramount importance for companies of all sizes. IP Rights (IPRs) are crucial assets, integral to corporate strategies, and their effective management is key to creating value.

This course offers a comprehensive understanding of various IPRs, emphasizing their significance for innovative companies. It guides you through the steps involved in protecting your creations/ideas and provides insights into available support services for future entrepreneurs and business professionals dealing with IPRs.

Who is your lecturer?

 

 Natacha Esteves

Dr. Natacha Estèves holds a PhD in Law from Sciences Po Law School. She has received her Master Degree in International Economic Law from the Panthéon-Sorbonne University in Paris. She has been a post-doc researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Innovation & Competition in Munich. Her research focuses on open usages of patents. She is currently Innovation Hub manager for Ulysseus at the MCI.

Language

English

Student workload

5 ECTS (including 1-2 ECTS asynchronous self-study)

Assessment

Presentations and a written assignment

Mode

 

Online: 2 evenings each week + Friday afternoon each week | synchronous (+ further teaching units asynchronous)

Date

November 11 – 22, 2024

Contents

This course provides you with an overview of Intellectual Property (IP) and equips you with essential skills for navigating the IP landscape. In this course, you will:

  • Explore the pivotal role of intellectual property for businesses and entrepreneurs.
  • Learn how to protect your ideas
  • Discover different protection options (patents, copyrights, industrial designs, trademarks)
  • Gain insights into application procedures for Patents, Trademarks, and Designs.
  • Explore strategies, enforcement, licensing, and assignment.
  • Learn how to transform your ideas into valuable assets for your business.
  • Identify support avenues for your innovation journey.
  • Learn about available assistance for young entrepreneurs, innovators, and SMEs at EU, regional, and national levels.

Learning Goals 

Upon completion of this elective course, students will be able to:

  • Understand the importance of IPRs for businesses, entrepreneurship & innovation
  • Know how to identify and distinguish the different IPRs and their respective regimes
  • Know about the various options for IPRs management
  • Know the relevant processes related to IPRs and how to inquire/use existing support for IP, particularly for young entrepreneurs and SMEs. 
 

 

REGISTER HERE 

Remember, you have to choose a total of four electives!

Entrepreneurship & Innovation

Sustainability

Why choose this course?

Tourism is a dynamic and fast-growing industry that plays a significant role in both local and global economies. It has a strong impact on communities and the environment while also providing numerous opportunities for sustainable growth. This elective is an excellent choice for students who want to gain a broad understanding of the tourism industry and its trends and challenges, and who want to develop skills and knowledge that can be applied to a wide range of careers. It also enables students to reflect on and learn from their own travel experiences and the region they live in.

Who is your lecturer?

 

Hubert Siller

Prof. Hubert Siller is the Head of the Department of Tourism & Leisure Business at MCI. His current research and consulting focus is on leadership & management, sustainable destination development and international winter sports markets. Hubert Siller accompanies personalities, companies and institutions from the tourism & leisure industry in strategic issues and is an official board member of the Austrian Tourism.

Birgit Bosio

Dr. Birgit Bosio is a Lecturer at MCI Tourism. Her research and teaching focuses on international tourism trends, service design, customer experience, Alpine tourism, and sustainability & tourism. Dr. Bosio is also in charge of the Tirol Tourism Research (www.ttr.tirol) project, the central knowledge platform for tourism in Tirol.

Jannes Bayer

Jannes Bayer, MA, is a Senior Lecturer at MCI Tourism. As a sports scientist, his research focuses on sports tourism, outdoor recreation, and sustainable destination development. Jannes Bayer is also the coordinator of the study programs at MCI Tourism and part of the Sports Research Lab Tirol.

Language

English

Student workload

5 ECTS (including 1-2 ECTS asynchronous self-study)

Assessment

Project Work in groups

Mode

On-Campus: Monday till Friday during the day | synchronous (+ further teaching units asynchronous)

Date

November 11 – 22, 2024

Contents

  • Development and current state of international tourism management with a particular focus on the unique features of the alpine tourism product
  • Emerging trends and challenges in the tourism industry, including changing consumer behavior and the shift towards sustainable tourism practices
  • Importance of responsible tourism management practices that not only minimizes negative impacts on the environment and local communities, but creates positive experiences for locals, guest and employees
  • Best practices including field trip, case studies and guest lectures from different parts of the world

 

Learning Goals 

Upon completion of this elective course, students will be able to:

  • explain the main concepts, theories, and principles of the international tourism industry
  • identify the current trends and challenges in alpine and international tourism
  • explain the principles of sustainable tourism and the importance of responsible tourism practices, including the creation of positive impact of tourism on the environment and local communities
  • identify challenges and opportunities for the international tourism industry, and to develop their own ideas for responsible tourism practices in this context
 

 

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Remember, you have to choose a total of four electives!

Why choose this course?

Students benefit from valuable knowledge that is expected of future managers and from the necessary soft skills needed to succeed. Besides introducing sustainability through an economic, social and transformational lens, the format teaches methodological and practical skills in an unconventional way. Students learn valuable skills for all areas of life that are becoming increasingly important from a recruiting perspective: critical thinking, discussion skills, systemic understanding (meta-perspective) and personal responsibility. The most important thing: it will be fun!

Who is your lecturer?

 

Hannah Gratzer


Hannah Gratzer:
Expertise in future-oriented topics (Sustainability, Communications, Leadership, Gen Z). Self-employed as a Business Coach, Consultant and Trainer. Currently teaching at FH Wien, FH Burgenland, University of Salzburg.

Lena Stern


Lena Stern:
Expertise in a wide variation of sustainability & related topics like Transformation, Communication & Circular Economy. Consultant for Sustainability, Transformation & Cultural Change at one2zero GmbH. Former sustainability manager at IKEA and ÖAMTC.

Language

English

Student workload

5 ECTS (including 1-2 ECTS asynchronous self-study)

Assessment

No conventional final examination. Grading is based on critical analysis of the topics and reflection tasks afterwards through presentations and group discussions

Mode

Mixed: 2 weekends on-campus (Friday afternoon + Saturday) + 1 weekend online | synchronous (+ further teaching units asynchronous)

Date

November 8 & 9, 2024
November 15 & 16, 2024
November 22 & 23, 2024

Contents

  • Foundations of sustainability (definition, historical context, concepts of sustainability, responsibilities)

Deep Dive:

  • Environmental sustainability (biodiversity, climate change and resources)
  • Social sustainability (equity and social justice, education, health, diversity and inclusion)
  • Economic sustainability (sustainable and responsible business models e.g. circular economy, doughnut economy, degrowth)
  • Personal responsibility in sustainability (personal sustainability practices, communication, argumentation, confidence) 

Learning Goals 

  • Systemic understanding of sustainability: understanding of the interconnectedness of environmental, social and economic systems using a systemic thinking approach
  • Self-responsibility: heightened awareness of responsibilities and a pro-active mindset for addressing sustainability challenges
  • Leadership: emphasize holistic views of future challenges and ensure inclusivity
  • Communication: navigate in polarizing discussions; empathy and active listening to facilitate constructive dialogues
  • Implementation: practical knowledge of best practices in political, business, and personal contexts
 

 

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Remember, you have to choose a total of four electives!

Why choose this course?

Sustainability is a critical issue in today's world, and understanding its various dimensions is essential. This elective offers practical insights and real-world applications, making the learning experience highly relevant and immediately applicable.

Scandinavia is renowned for its progressive approaches to sustainability and circularity. This elective provides a unique opportunity to experience these approaches first hand.

Important information: While the agenda is organized by the lecturers (Weißbriacher & Degischer), the students must organize and pay for travel and accommodation.

Who is your lecturer?

 

Daniel Degischer

Daniel Degischer holds a position as Senior Lecturer at the Department of Management & Law at MCI. His research interests are in the field of strategic management & sustainability. He has published in academic journals, and has been track chair for the Knowledge and Learning track at the British Academy of Management Annual Meetings since 2016. Moreover, he has been guest lecturer in the MSc program International Business at TU Dublin and at EGADE, Tecnologico de Monterrey.

Sabine Weisbriacher

Sabine Weißbriacher is an Assistant at the Department of Management & Law at MCI. She has an academic background in business administration and corporate governance. She accompanied projects in the field of responsible management, sustainability and social impact at MCI.

Language

English

Student workload

5 ECTS (including 1-2 ECTS asynchronous self-study)

Assessment

Project work

Mode

On-Campus: Monday till Friday during the day | synchronous (+ further teaching units asynchronous)

Date

November 11 – 22, 2024

Contents

We will embark on a transformative journey to Copenhagen, the heart of sustainability. Our study trip offers first hand insights of the world's most sustainable city, as ranked by the Environmental Performance Index (EPI).
We will

  • Engage directly with companies driving sustainable change.
  • Gain insights from environmental experts.
  • Explore the sustainable corners of the city - by bike, besides other social activities.

Ahead of the tour, students will receive input on

  • The challenges of sustainable transformation.
  • Sustainable organizational development.
  • Governance mechanisms to drive sustainable change.

 STUDY TOUR PROGRAM

Learning Goals 

This course seeks to develop critical thinking skills and an in-depth understanding of corporate development and transformation to make students the change-makers of tomorrow. Students will develop a theoretical and practical understanding of transforming organizations and societies and will:

  • Develop skills to analyze contemporary organizational issues related to sustainability.
  • Understand the theoretical foundations of organizational change and development.
  • Become aware of practical challenges.
  • Generate transformational and developmental plans for more sustainable organizations.
 

 

REGISTER HERE 

Remember, you have to choose a total of four electives!

Why choose this course?

Choosing 'Making Value Chains Efficient and Sustainable' is pivotal for students navigating the evolving business landscape. This elective merges efficiency and sustainability, addressing the pressing need for environmentally conscious practices. Through real-world case studies, students gain practical insights, acquire analytical skills to identify and rectify inefficiencies. The course molds graduates into holistic problem-solvers, adept at driving positive change. In a job market valuing eco-responsibility, this elective positions students as sought-after professionals capable of streamlining processes and championing sustainability.

Who is your lecturer?

 

Martin Pillei

Prof. Dr. Martin Pillei is Head of the Department and Director of Studies in Industrial Engineering & Management at MCI. He holds a doctoral degree from the Department of Chemical- and Bioengineering at Friedrich-Alexander-University (FAU) Erlangen-Nuernberg/Germany. His expertise in research and teaching focuses on mechanical process engineering and energy & material flow cost accounting. He has strong industrial expertise with more than 50 successfully finished industrial R&D projects.

Language

English

Student workload

5 ECTS

Assessment

Report written as Executive Summary

Mode

Online: 2 evenings each week + Friday afternoon each week | synchronous (+ further teaching units asynchronous)

Date

November 11 – 22, 2024

Contents

Ecological and economic influence on material and energy flows. Assessment of the environmental aspects and potential environmental impacts associated with a product or production process.

  • Product-related life cycle assessment
  • Operational life cycle assessment
  • DIN EN ISO 14040
  • Modelling, calculation and evaluation of material and energy flows.
  • Calculation and visualization of energy and material flows
  • Creating CO2 balances of daily life products
  • Environmental impact over the entire product life cycle
  • Cost accounting -> eco-efficient decisions
  • Material flow cost analysis (MCFA) - Determining the true costs of losses and waste
  • CSRD

Learning Goals 

Upon completion of this elective course, students will be able to:

  • Gain knowledge of the various forms of energy consumed within companies
  • Identify cost drivers and understand relationship between production processes and energy consumption
  • Understand methods for cost allocation
  • Explore Benchmarking and Performance Metrics to measure efficiency improvements
  • Perform Basic Environmental Impact Assessments
  • Understand current challenges with regard to Regulatory Compliance and CSR
  • Explore opportunities for energy efficiency improvements and waste reduction
 

 

REGISTER HERE 

Remember, you have to choose a total of four electives!

Why choose this course?

Students will choose this elective because it will enable them to better understand the changes necessary to tackle the contemporary challenges the world is facing, and show them different ways of approaching these challenges. They will have the opportunity to collaborate and co-create solutions for authentic local and global challenges with students from different disciplines and develop a mindset of transformative agency that allows them to envision positive trajectories for the future.

Who is your lecturer?

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Mag. Regina Obexer, M.Ed. is a senior lecturer and Head of the Center for Responsible Management & Social Impact at MCI. She coordinates activities and initiatives in the fields of responsibility, sustainability and ethics across MCI. Her teaching and research interests are at the intersection of digital education, education for sustainable development, and responsible management education. She is passionate about supporting learners in developing knowledge, skills and agency to tackle the pressing issues of our age.

 

Julia Waldegger

Mag.iur. Julia Waldegger, MSc is a lecturer at the department Business Administration Online at MCI | The Entrepreneurial School. She has an academic background in law, political science and organization studies and focuses on algorithmic management and its consequences in her research. She endeavours to weave themes of responsibility, sustainability, and ethics in her educational approach.

Language

English

Student workload

5 ECTS (including 1-2 ECTS asynchronous self-study)

Assessment

Students will be assessed based on

  • Their understanding and knowledge of the concept of sustainable development and the SDGs (Exam, 20%)
  • The case work and solutions they develop (Group presentation, 50%)
  • Their demonstrated understanding of personal responsibility and agency (Reflection, 30%)

Mode

 

On-Campus: Monday till Friday during the day | synchronous (+ further teaching units asynchronous)

Date

November 11 – 22, 2024

Contents

  • This course introduces students to the concept of Sustainable Development through systems transformation.
  • Students will discuss the global challenges facing humanity in the 21st century and learn about key transformations necessary for a thriving future.
  • Students will then work on a set of authentic cases and co-create solutions.
  • They will present their solutions to others and engage in a critical peer review process to further improve and expand their ideas.
  • Finally, they will engage in a structured reflective activity to explore their own agency and responsibility in transforming our world.

Learning Goals 

Upon completion of this elective course, students will be able to:

  • Understand 21st century grand challenges, including environmental, social and economic aspects and global responses
  • Develop a systems perspective of the challenges and solutions
  • Understand concrete local and global challenges and their impact
  • Co-create ideas and approaches to solving selected challenges
  • Critically evaluate ideas and challenges created based on their impact on people, planet and prosperity
  • Reflect on their own role and agency in furthering the necessary transformations.
 

 

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Remember, you have to choose a total of four electives!

Entrepreneurship & Innovation

Digitalization

Why choose this course?

  • Programming has become an important skill in anyone who wants to work with data and one of the more important languages when it comes to data analysis is Python. While there are many programming languages out there, Python stands out for its simplicity and rapid prototyping and a significant community with modules for any application imaginable.
  • This course will start from scratch and assumes the students have little to no computer language experience. This is a good opportunity for anyone who wants to have a working knowledge of programming and understand the potential of Python for a variety of applications.
  • The lecture will also cover data analysis techniques and econometrics which would be useful for anyone who wants to work in Big Data or Financial applications.
Who is your lecturer?
 

Daniel McGuinness

Daniel Tunç Mcguiness received the B.Sc. degree in electrical engineering from Istanbul Technical University (ITU), Turkey, and the Ph.D. degree from the University of Liverpool, U.K., where he studied macro-scale molecular communications both experimentally and theoretically. In his B.Sc., he took a final-year specialization in solid-rotor induction motors with ITU. He is currently a Lecturer with Management Centre Innsbruck. His focuses are on molecular and nano-communication systems, electric machines and robotics.

Language

English

Student workload

5 ECTS (including 1-2 ECTS asynchronous self-study)

Assessment

1 Project (100%)

Mode

Mixed: 2 weekends on-campus (Friday afternoon + Saturday) + 1 weekend online | synchronous (+ further teaching units asynchronous)

Date

November 8 & 9, 2024
November 15 & 16, 2024
November 22 & 23, 2024

Contents

This course will take you from the fundamentals of programming to using Python for a variety of applications:

  1. Programming Fundamentals
    1. Python: A History & Hello, World!
    2. Compilers & Compilation
    3. Inputs & Outputs
    4. Type Safety & Limits of Logic
    5. Expressions & Functions
    6. Object Oriented Programming
  2. Numerical Programming
    1. NumPy Package, an Introduction
    2. Fundamentals of Arrays
    3. Linear Algebra Concepts using Python
  3. Data Formats and Handling
    1. Pandas Package, an Introduction
    2. Series & Data Frames
    3. Import & Export Data
  4. Data Visualizations and Illustrations
    1. Matplotlib Package, an Introduction
    2. Figures and Subplots
    3. Plot types and styles
    4. Pandas Layers
  5. Applications

Learning Goals 

Upon completion of this elective course, students will be able to:

  • Learn fundamentals of programming: The students will be able to use the knowledge here to learn other languages (i.e., C/C++, Java) and will be able to work with different programming paradigms (i.e., functional, object oriented).
  • Understand Python modules: Python relies heavily on modules; packages that do a variety of tasks. Understanding these would allow the students to do rapid prototyping and writing their own modules and possibly contribute to the open source community.
  • Use of important modules: This lecture series will cover Pandas, matplotlib, NumPy and SciPy: fundamental packages that are almost in any functional python programs. The lecture will cover the functions and options used by these modules.
  • Students will understand how python works as a programming language and as a community and be able to learn all the necessary tools for their future work in Python.
  • Understand the fundamentals of econometrics and apply data science methods for studying economic phenomena.

Recommended literature for the course is as follows:

  • A Primer on Scientific Programming with Python (2nd Edition),
  • Learning Python (5th Edition),
  • Python Data Science Handbook,
  • Python Algorithms - Mastering Basic Algorithms in the Python Language,
  • Python for Probability, Statistics and Machine Learning.
 

 

REGISTER HERE 

Remember, you have to choose a total of four electives!

Why choose this course?

Students should choose this course because it addresses the challenges in the financial industry related to its digital transformation. Students will be able to engage with digital innovations in the financial industry critically and better understand business models within the financial industry. The course provides concrete recommendations for later professional practice in companies and as consumers of financial services. The environment for imparting knowledge and skills is also research-oriented and largely dispenses with elements of frontal teaching, instead relying heavily on impulse lectures, working on case studies and conducting empirically market and competition analyses.

Who is your lecturer?

 

Tim Herberger

Univ.-Doz. Dr. habil. Tim Alexander Herberger: Associate Professor and Chaired Professor (Entrepreneurship, Finance and Digitalization) and Head of Master Study Program Management and Leadership at Andrássy University Budapest (since 09/2018); PhD 2012; Habilitation 2023; since 2017 lecturer in the online master program Corporate Governance and Finance. Research and Teaching Focus: Finance; Financial Intermediation; Digital Finance; Intangible Assets; Sport Management

 

Language

English

Student workload

5 ECTS (including 1-2 ECTS asynchronous self-study)

Assessment

Student Research Project and Presentation

Mode

Online: 2 evenings each week + Friday afternoon each week | synchronous (+ further teaching units asynchronous)

Date

November 11 – 22, 2024

Contents

  • FinTechs and Techfins as new players in the financial industry
  • Financial Intermediation in a digitalized environment (e.g., the role of fake news on capital markets)
  • Platform-based financial Instruments (e.g., Crowdfunding, Social Trading)
  • AI-based Instruments in the financial industry (e.g., Robo Advisory)
  • Blockchain and Cryptocurrencies in the financial industry (e.g., DeFi-Networks, stablecoins, cryptocurrencies as a regular currency, Central Bank Digital Currency)
  • Challenges for Financial Literacy in a digitalized finance eco-system.

Learning Goals 

Upon completion of this elective course, students will be able to:

  • Upon completion of this elective course, students will be able to:-Students learn about the latest developments in the financial markets and corporate finance in the financial sector's digital transformation context.
  • Students understand the necessary adjustments in financial literacy caused by the fundamental changes in the financial industry.
  • As part of a flip-classroom and research-based concept, the goal is for students to prepare the theory-based content self-study and apply it in a practical but research-oriented manner together with the lecturer during the synchronous teaching period and discuss it critically. This generates in-depth and knowledge-based competence on the part of the students.
 

 

REGISTER HERE 

Remember, you have to choose a total of four electives!

Why choose this course?

This course prepares you for a job market in which humans who know how to use AI replace those that don’t. We see path-breaking, AI-enabled technologies, such as ChatGPT, Bing, or Bard, develop with unprecedented speed. We can perceive them as threats or opportunities – but we can no longer deny their existence. The knowledge and skills acquired in this course will enable you to understand how AI can support you individually to become more effective in your own studies and work as well as companies to increase competitiveness, but also shed light on AI’s “dark sides”.

Who is your lecturer?

 


Sabrina Schneider

Sabrina Schneider is a professor for strategy and innovation at the MCI’s Business & Management department. Her research and teaching interests center around digital technologies’ impact on strategy and work. She is particularly interested in human-AI collaboration and the consequences for human work. Prior to joining the MCI faculty, Sabrina gained more than >10 years of work experience in industry, consulting, and academia in finance, strategy, innovation, and technology management. To study, work and research, she has lived in many European countries (Denmark, Germany, France, Spain, Italy, Sweden, UK) and abroad (New Zealand, US, Chile, Singapore). 

Language

English

Student workload

5 ECTS (including 1-2 ECTS asynchronous self-study)

Assessment

Group presentations

Mode

On-Campus: Monday till Friday during the day | synchronous (+ further teaching units asynchronous)

Date

November 11 – 22, 2024

Contents

  • State-of-the-art: Forms of artificial intelligence (AI) and AI-enabled support
  • AI-enabled human augmentation vs. automation
  • Agency and autonomy of AI
  • Trust in AI, opacity of AI
  • AI & creativity
  • Future of work/ Biohacking
  • Ethical considerations regarding AI
  • Operational skills for effective leverage of AI-enabled support (including prompting techniques, tools, etc.)

Learning Goals 

Upon completion of this elective course, students will be able to:

  • Understand the different roles “intelligent” technologies can take (augmentation vs. automation)
  • Become more effective at using digital, AI-enabled support in a responsible and transparent manner
  • Critically reflect upon the consequences of technological advancement in the field of AI on individuals, businesses, and society
  • Please note: This course does not require any prior technical skills – the emphasis of this course lies on behavioral aspects, emphasizing a discussion of AI’s potential impact on our future of work. 
 

 

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Remember, you have to choose a total of four electives!

Why choose this course?

Blockchain and cryptocurrencies are two of the most bespoken topics of the last years. Nevertheless, curricula lacking courses with current independent data and knowledge. This course provides students with distinct knowledge about blockchain from a sociotechnical, economical, technical and le-gal perspective and provides insights in the new crypto economy and Web 3.0.  Students are guided to reveal the most current questions like:

  • How blockchains could be used and in which situations is a usage counterproductive?
  • How crypto tokens can be used, utilized, booked, taxed …?
Who is your lecturer?
 


Thomas Dilger


As the main coordinator of this elective, Thomas Dilger, BA MA teaches and leads various research projects on different aspects of IT governance, corporate budgeting, crypto-accounting, Web 3.0 and corporate finance. Besides his current position as Senior Lecturer, he teaches at several other universities, e.g. University of Omaha Nebraska | Executive Master of Science in Information.

Aleksander Groth

Aleksander Groth PhD is a full-time lecturer at MCI and holds a Diploma Degree in Business Management, with a specialization in Service and Strategic Management. His core lectures are in the field of human-computer-interaction, with a focus on digital behavior, applied project work, as well as methods courses in quantitative research and user-centered studies. He held courses at MCI and at the University of Omaha in Nebraska, USA.

Arno Rottensteiner

Arno Rottensteiner, BA MA holds a Master’s degree in Management, Communication & IT and gained international experience during an educational stay at the London School of Economics and Political Science. Currently, he is pursuing a PhD in Strategic Management with a research focus on understanding drivers and barriers of organizational openness of SMEs.

Language

English

Student workload

5 ECTS (including 1-2 ECTS asynchronous self-study)

Assessment

The following point structure determines the exam grade for this course.

Component                           Percentage

MC-Exam                               50%

Paper/Case Submissions       50%

The MC-exam consists of 20 questions and exercises, duration 30 minutes. The date of the exam will be set 1 to 2 weeks after the last session. The exact date will be communicated at the first course day.

The cases/papers are going to be all the content learned in class and will be submitted in-dividually. 50% of the total grade. The due date of the assignments is communicated in each session by the respective lecturer.

Mode

On-Campus: Monday till Friday during the day | synchronous (+ further teaching units asynchronous)

Date

November 11 – 22, 2024

Contents

  • What is the Blockchain?
  • Types of Blockchains
  • Blockchain Simulation
  • Blockchain Security
  • Blockchain Limitations
  • Terminology: e.g. Web 3.0
  • Impact of Crypto Communities
  • How companies handle Crypto Tokens?
  • Crypto Accounting (UGB and IFRS)
  • Crypto Taxation
  • Crypto Regulatory
  • Smart Contracts
  • Build your own Smart Contract
  • EVM vs. Non EVM
  • Blockchain Trilemma: Scalability, Security, Decentralization
  • Current Trends
  • Future Outlook and Business Opportunities

Learning Goals 

Upon completion of this elective course students:

  • Understand blockchain phenomena and differentiate types.
  • Learn how companies handle crypto tokens in financial statements per regulations.
  • Gain knowledge on crypto taxation, including declaring gains and losses.
  • Identify changes in crypto regulatory and anticipate future developments.
  • Understand validation routines like proof of work, proof of stake for gamification.
  • Grasp blockchain possibilities, downsides, and limitations.
  • Address security concerns in blockchain transactions.
  • Gain insights into current trends and business opportunities from experts.
 

 

REGISTER HERE 

Remember, you have to choose a total of four electives!

Why choose this course?

Are you interested in understanding how Artificial Intelligence is increasingly used to improve value chains, automate tasks or build entirely new business models? In this course you will receive an interactive and gamified introduction to the principles of Artificial Intelligence. Through demonstrations and group discussions, you will learn what Intelligent Agents are and how they can help improve modern business processes. In doing so, you will experience the potential AI technology can bring to the table but also understand its limitations and potentially challenging application fields.

Who is your lecturer?
 

Stephan Schlogl


Prof. Dr. Stephan Schlögl
is a member of the MCiT faculty focusing on Human-centered computing, particularly investigating the use and adoption of AI applications. 

Reinhard Bernsteiner


Prof. Dr. Reinhard C.
Bernsteiner is a member of the MCiT faculty focusing on Information Systems and Smart Technologies, particularly addressing challenges of Big Data and Information Engineering.

Christian Ploder


Prof. Dr. Christian Ploder
is a member of the MCiT faculty focusing on Operational Excellence, particularly tackling challenges of technology-supported process optimization.

Language

English

Student workload

5 ECTS (including 1-2 ECTS asynchronous self-study)

Mode

On-Campus: Monday till Friday during the day | synchronous (+ further teaching units asynchronous)

Date

November 11 – 22, 2024

Contents

This course covers the following topics:

  • Introduction to Artificial Intelligence (AI) including the history of AI
  • The concept of Intelligent Agents
  • The challenges of turning a real-world setting into an AI problem space
  • (Big)Data and its relevance for the quality of AI business solutions
  • Fundamentals of machine learning and its applications in domains such as production, tourism, marketing, sales and the creative industry

Learning Goals 

Upon completion of this elective course,

  • Students will be able to understand the key principles of Artificial Intelligence and know about the field’s historical development.
  • They will be familiar with the concept of an Intelligent Agent and how such is used to foster value chain processes and other business contexts.
  • They will be familiar with different machine learning concepts and their application in domains such as production, tourism, marketing and the creative industry.
 

 

REGISTER HERE 

Remember, you have to choose a total of four electives!

Why choose this course?

The relationship between digitalization and democracy requires in-depth consideration. This course aims to provide students with a basic understanding of both the political landscape and technological innovation. This knowledge will enable them to recognize the potential benefits of technology while critically assessing the associated challenges, always keeping the basic principles of democracy in mind. A central part of the course is a three-day field trip to Vienna, where students will visit various institutions and interact with decision-makers at different stages of the policy cycle.

Important Information: While the program is organized by the lecturers, it is the students' responsibility to organize and pay for travel and accommodation.

Who is your lecturer?
 

Peter Mirski

Peter J. Mirski is head of the study programs Management, Communication & IT and Digital Business & Software Engineering. He is an honorary professor at the University of Omaha, Nebraska. His teaching focuses on innovation management, IT governance, strategy and strategic management. In his role as Chief Information Officer, he also serves as the head of MCI's central IT Services Department.

Magdalena Posch


Magdalena Posch
works as an assistant in the Management, Communication & IT degree program. As a PhD candidate in political science, she focuses on democratic structures, parliamentary processes and political communication.

Language

English

Student workload

5 ECTS (including 1-2 ECTS asynchronous self-study)

Assessment

Portfolio (40), Written Exam (60)

Mode

On-Campus: Monday till Friday during the day | synchronous (+ further teaching units asynchronous)

Date

November 11 – 22, 2024

Contents

  • Integration of digital technologies in various phases of the policy cycle
  • Process of gathering, using, disseminating public data
  • Open data initiatives as catalysts for transparency
  • Influence of digital technologies on the dynamics of negotiation processes
  • Digital platforms as enablers for greater public participation
  • Ethical dimensions of data-driven political decision-making
  • Critical analysis of applications and best-practice examples from the field, including a three-day excursion to Vienna

Learning Goals 

Upon completion of this elective course, students will be able to:

  • Understand the basic principles of integrating digital technologies in various stages of the policy cycle
  • Identify emerging technology trends in digital technology and examine their possible effects on government operations
  • Identify and analyze ethical dimensions in the management of public data
  • Evaluate the effectiveness and challenges of open data initiatives
  • Understand and analyze the impact of digital technologies on the dynamics of negotiation processes
  • Understand the challenges and opportunities of digital platforms in facilitating citizen involvement
 

 

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Remember, you have to choose a total of four electives!

Entrepreneurship & Innovation

Globalization

Why choose this course?

This elective course addresses the violation of universal human rights. Conflicts, climate change, and inequality have exposed billions of people to economic hardships and poverty. Authoritarianism and patriarchal structures have denied the rights of women and ethnic and sexual minorities. Due to multidimensional poverty every year more than 5 million children die before they reach their 5th birthday. Billions of people are living on less than US$ 2.20 a day without access to health services and quality education.  In many countries, migrant workers’ rights are massively violated. In this course, students will learn the structural causes behind human rights violations and what can and must be done against them.

Who is your lecturer?
 

Belachew Gebrewold

Belachew Gebrewold is a professor of International Relations and the Head of the Department and Studies of Social Work and Social Policy at MCI. His main research areas are social policy, African politics and conflicts, and migration. He was also a member of the steering committee for the preparation of the United Nations Global Compact for Regular, Safe, and Orderly Migration preparatory process in 2017. Moreover, he was a member of the Migration Council of the Austrian Ministry of Internal Affairs from 2014 until 2017.

Language

English

Student workload

5 ECTS (including 1-2 ECTS asynchronous self-study)

Assessment

ILV (Group Work and Presentation)

Mode

On-Campus: Monday till Friday during the day | synchronous (+ further teaching units asynchronous)

Date

November 11 – 22, 2024

Contents

  • Universal and relative human rights
  • Human rights and (de)colonization
  • Human rights and state sovereignty Humanitarian intervention
  • Economic globalization and human rights
  • Human rights and multidimensional poverty
  • Human rights and global justice
  • Human rights of women, children, persons with disabilities, and migrant workers

Learning Goals 

Upon completion of this elective course, students will be able to:

  • Understand human rights from historical perspectives
  • Understand whether and why human rights are universal or particular/relative
  • Critically assess the tension between local cultures and human rights values
  • Analyzing the dilemma between military intervention for the protection of universal human rights and non-interference in the internal affairs of sovereign states
  • Being able to explain how universal human rights and the right to development are interlinked
  • Understand the violation of rights of women, children, persons with disabilities, and migrant workers
  • Understand why extreme poverty, lack of access to health services, and poor or non-existence of access to education is human rights violations
  • Understand how human rights are the foundation of global justice and environmental protection
 

 

REGISTER HERE 

Remember, you have to choose a total of four electives!

Why choose this course?

  • You will acquire economic and regional science skills and be prepared for professional activities in a globalized economy.
  • China is becoming a global superpower, Asia an emerging region! Competences about China and the Asian region are in high demand and shall be part of your university education.
  • China is a country full of history and tradition, a country with people of a different culture, a country with economic and technological progress, a country of increasing global importance… and at the same time a country with many contradictions.
  • Together with India, Japan, South Korea, Vietnam and many more countries, Asia is not only a populous, but also diverse and vibrant region.
  • For students of both interest and career consideration, this course will provide knowledge and insights into this increasingly important region.
Who is your lecturer?
 


Wei Manske Wang

Wei Manske Wang: Originally from Shanghai, holds a Bachelor's degree in Germanistik from China and pursued Business Administration in both Diplom and Master programs with Honors, attaining a PhD in Economics in Germany. With 14 years at a Bavarian "hidden champion," she led internationalization projects in Marketing, Sales, Strategy, and R&D. Since September 2020, Wei is a Professor at MCI | DIE UNTERNEHMERISCHE HOCHSCHULE® in Innsbruck, focusing on intercultural understanding. Her global experience emphasizes the interconnectedness of the economy and the crucial role of trust in international business. In May 2021, she initiated the CHINA CENTER at MCI, acting as a bridge between Europe and China. Since September 2023, Wei serves as Secretary General of the AUSTRIAN HONG KONG SOCIETY (AHKS), actively promoting economic relations between Austria and Hong Kong/Greater Bay Area in China.

Language

English

Student workload

5 ECTS (including 1-2 ECTS asynchronous self-study)

Assessment

ILV (Group Work and Presentation)

Mode

On-Campus: Monday till Friday during the day | synchronous (+ further teaching units asynchronous)

Date

November 11 – 22, 2024

Contents

  • The historical roots of China: What are structural legacies of the past? How do Chinese perceptions of history influence the present society?
  • The institutional setting of the Chinese economy: state-owned enterprises, private-owned businesses
  • The political system and its ramifications in the domain of economic policy and business. How does this affect central aspects of business environment?
  • Culture and societal values: China represents an amazing mix of global metropolitan life and a resurgence of tradition, deeply enmeshed in her high-speed urbanization process that continue shaping the country.
  • What do you know about Chinese philosophies in the past? What do you know about Chinese values today? What are implications for business, such as regarding consumer demand of young generation?
  • Behavioural aspects of business practice: We look at the ‘Chinese way’ in establishing social relations in the business domain, and explore Chinese organizational behaviour in companies.
  • What are ‘mega-trends’ of the future affecting the outlook for Chinese business? Such as demographic change, environmental crises, digitalization and the question of political stability.
  • Institutions and strategic arrangements in Asia: ASEAN, APEC, BRICS, RCEP etc.
  • What is behind Chinese long-term strategy “Belt and road initiative”?
  • Emerging countries in Asia: India, Vietnam etc.
  • Is an Asian Century dawning?

Learning Goals 

Upon completion of this elective course, students will be able to:

  • Awareness of foreign cultures and understanding their causes
  • Think out of the box and establish global horizons
  • Preparing for the challenges of future professional life in a global environment
  • Doing business in China/Asia successfully requires a holistic view on China/Asia and a thorough understanding how business is done there! This course aims at providing students with the necessary knowledge about contextual determinants of business practice (culture, politics, economy, society, history) and introduces exemplary reference cases.
 

 

REGISTER HERE 

Remember, you have to choose a total of four electives!

Entrepreneurship & Innovation

Society

Why choose this course?

In our globalized world, students encounter people with different belief systems and from diverse backgrounds. This course will enhance their knowledge of diversity and discrimination, providing them with valuable skills that will also benefit their future professional life. It will support students in understanding and respecting differences, fostering empathy, and imparting strategies for creating inclusive environments, all of which are highly relevant and sought-after qualities in the workplace. The learning from this course contributes to their overall personal growth in an interconnected world.

Who is your lecturer?

Robert Koglek

 

Robert Koglek, Senior Lecturer at the MCI/Department of Social Work, worked for 12 years as a manager in a non-profit organization in a culturally diverse area in London. He started his career in Germany working with refugees including unaccompanied asylum-seeking children (UASC), families and elderly people. His main research interests include diversity, discrimination, anti-racist approaches and post-colonialism.

Language

English

Student workload

5 ECTS (including 1-2 ECTS asynchronous self-study)

Mode

 

On-Campus: Monday till Friday during the day | synchronous (+ further teaching units asynchronous)

Date

November 11 – 22, 2024

Contents

  • Overview of current definitions of Diversity and Positive Discrimination
  • Introduction to frameworks that explore different categories of discrimination
  • Application of reflective tools to get a better understanding of one’s own biases and assumptions
  • Discovering why knowledge of Diversity and Positive Discrimination is important across all disciplines
  • Analysing current global developments from different diverse perspectives
  • Learning about reasons and historical context why policies that promote Positive Discrimination were developed

Learning Goals 

Upon completion of this elective course, students will be able to: 

  • Developing and/ or enhancing critical thinking skills
  • Understanding the importance of respecting people from diverse backgrounds and identities
  • Knowledge of use of reflective tools to challenge own perspectives
  • Being aware of positive and structural discrimination and their obstructive impact
  • Being able to implement strategies and ideas to tackle discrimination in any context
  • Acquired enhanced skills to communication and collaborate
 

 

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Remember, you have to choose a total of four electives!

Why choose this course?

Events and festivals come in different shapes and sizes, and they play a significant role in our everyday lives. Some are professionally organized; others just “happen” when people get together and celebrate what is important to them. This elective allows students to develop an understanding of why we attend events, what is involved in organizing different types of events, and how events impact upon communities and society. Students will also reflect on their own event expectations, motivations, experiences and memories, and gain skills and knowledge that can be applied to a range of careers.

Who is your lecturer?

Raphaela Stadler

 


Assoc.-Prof. Raphaela Stadler, PhD
, is a Senior Lecturer and Researcher at MCI Tourism. She has international experience in teaching Event and Festival Management, and is currently involved in several research projects with event organizations in Austria, Australia, New Zealand, and the U.K. Her main area of expertise are community events and their impact upon well-being.

 

Language

English

Student workload

5 ECTS (including 1-2 ECTS asynchronous self-study)

Assessment

Group project work

Mode

 

On-Campus: Monday till Friday during the day | synchronous (+ further teaching units asynchronous)

Date

November 11 – 22, 2024

Contents

  • Social and cultural impacts of events in general;
  • Cultural policy, cultural events and their role in society;
  • Managing culture, rituals, and traditions in an events context;
  • Events and marginalised communities, expressing difference, and issues of inclusion/exclusion;
  • Community cultural development and empowerment through events;
  • Events and placemaking, sense of belonging and pride;
  • Protest events and social movements;
  • Contemporary event case studies to apply theory to practice (e.g. Pride events, Full Moon Party, European Capital of Culture)

Note: students will be expected to attend an event/festival during the 2-week Interdisciplinary Elective period. This will most likely be in the evening and/or weekend. The event will be chosen approx. one month before the start of the course.

Learning Goals 

Upon completion of this elective course, students will be able to:

  • Discuss how events are both producers and preservers of culture;
  • Assess how events can help develop a sense of place and belonging;
  • Explain the role of rituals and rites of passage in events;
  • Highlight how events can express and celebrate ‘difference’;
  • Debate issues of discrimination, inclusion and exclusion at events;
  • Discuss how events can empower marginalised communities; and
  • Think critically about current challenges and opportunities within the events industry.
 

 

REGISTER HERE 

Remember, you have to choose a total of four electives!

Why choose this course?

Wealth accumulation is important for an individual’s long-term financial well-being, playing a crucial role in retirement-planning, large planned purchases or supporting their children. However large volumes of household wealth are held in highly unprofitable savings accounts. For long investment horizons and with only little guidance, vastly more profitable options exist. If used incorrectly, however, risky assets and strategies can lead to large losses, too. This course aims to provide a measured view of the potential benefits and dangers of financial market activity, aiming for concrete practical guidance at all stages.

Who is your lecturer?

Moritz Mosenhauer

 

Moritz Mosenhauer is a Professor at MCI, having commenced his academic career with a Bachelor's degree specializing in East Asian Economies. He pursued a Master's degree in economics at the Ludwig-Maximilians-University in Munich, and subsequently, undertook doctoral studies at the University of Glasgow in the same field. His primary research interests encompass experimental finance, organizational economics, and behavioral economics.

Language

English

Student workload

5 ECTS (including 1-2 ECTS asynchronous self-study)

Assessment

Students will be assessed based on

  • Their understanding and knowledge of the concept of sustainable development and the SDGs (Exam, 20%)
  • The case work and solutions they develop (Group presentation, 50%)
  • Their demonstrated understanding of personal responsibility and agency (Reflection, 30%)

Mode

 

Online: 2 evenings each week + Friday afternoon each week | synchronous (+ further teaching units asynchronous)

Date

November 11 – 22, 2024

Contents

We will discuss how to profitably invest available personal savings on financial markets. Supported by empirical evidence, we will place special focus on the following aspects:

  • Shares, ETFs, Bonds and Commodities as investment assets
  • Active vs. passive trading
  • Informational advantages
  • Loss aversion
  • “Smart Investors” and Self-Image Concerns
  • Gambling on Stock Markets
  • Diversification
  • Minimizing Trading Fees (Brokers, commission fees and bid-ask spreads)
  • actor Investing

Please consider that there are important and interesting aspects that we will (mostly) NOT cover in this course:

  • Real estate as investment assets
  • Cryptocurrencies as investment assets
  • Tax concerns

Learning Goals 

Upon completion of this elective course, students will be able to:

  • Make better use of available savings in growing their long-term wealth.
  • Recognize investment options on financial markets
  • Understand the damaging effects of:
    • Trying to “beat the market”
    • Hype & Panic in market sentiments
    • “Ego” in investments
    • Leisurely or compulsive gambling on financial markets
  • Understand the beneficial effects of:
    • Having a broad portfolio
    • Reducing Trading Costs
  • Know concrete starting points for their own trading activity.
  • Navigate different approaches for different personal circumstances.
 

 

REGISTER HERE 

Remember, you have to choose a total of four electives!

Why choose this course?

Students will have the unique opportunity to deep dive into the ‘Brussels bubble’ and to understand how to shape EU related topics. They will be able to better understand the decision-making processes within the European Institutions and how EU law is reflecting our daily lives. In this context, students will be aware of instruments and tools that can be used to participate in the decision-making process. Last but not least, students will have to unique chance to extend their personal and professional network.

Number of participants: max. 25 Students

Costs: Important information: while the agenda is organized by the lecturer, it is the students’ obligation to organize and pay for travel and accommodation. The lecturer will try to organize some financial sponsoring, without being able to make any legally binding guarantee.

Who is your lecturer?

Victoria Pirker

 

Victoria Pirker holds a degree in political science from the University of Innsbruck and Science Po Paris and has many years of work experience with and within the EU institutions, in particular the European Parliament. She specializes in EU foreign relations and worked as Advocacy officer for international human rights organizations in Brussels. Her motivation is to bring the European Union closer to citizens and to actively engage young people in the policy discussion.

Language

English

Student workload

5 ECTS (including 1-2 ECTS asynchronous self-study)

Assessment

At the end of the course, students will demonstrate the knowledge they have acquired in a written report

Mode

 

On-Campus: Monday till Friday during the day | synchronous (+ further teaching units asynchronous)

Date

November 11 – 22, 2024

Contents

  • To offer MCI students the opportunity to better understand the European Union (EU) policy-making, the EU institutions and the interaction between politics, business and civil society in Brussels.To offer MCI students the opportunity to better understand the European Union (EU) policy-making, the EU institutions and the interaction between politics, business and civil society in Brussels.
  • To give a first-hand insight in the decision-making processes and political mechanisms within the European Institution.
  • To better understand the concept of ‘lobbying’ (or ‘interest representation’) in the European Union.

Details on the two weeks:

  • Week 46 is intended to provide students (on site and online) with a basic knowledge of the EU institutions. Prof. Markus Frischhut will provide some background an EU Law. Since week 46 is a so-called ‘committee & plenary week’ of the European Parliament in Brussel, various interactive tools (e.g. live broadcasts to committee hearings and votes in Brussels) will be used.
  • During week 47, students will have the opportunity to visit Brussels and its EU institutions during 3-4 days and to establish personal contacts with members of the European Parliament and their staff, European Commission officials as well as representatives interest groups. Students will be provided the possibility to extend their personal and professional network and to elaborate on possible internship and/or job opportunities.

Learning Goals 

  • To understand the functioning of the European Union and the individual role of each EU institution (Commission, Council and Parliament).
  • To understand the functioning of the European Union and the individual role of each EU institution (Commission, Council and Parliament).
  • To understand the interaction between these EU institutions and to understand EU decision-making.
  • To understand the policy impact on our daily lives, as nowadays the most important decisions are taken at EU level.
  • To get an insight about what it means to be an EU citizen and to defend EU interests (‘lobbying’).
 

 

REGISTER HERE 

Remember, you have to choose a total of four electives!

Why choose this course?

Students will discover how various dynamics transform work environments and career concepts. Upon completing the course, students will be able to proactively plan their careers, considering personal values and individual strengths. The elective will also empower participants to navigate workplace challenges and develop an in-demand skill set that will help them succeed in a professional context. The simulation "Crafting Your Life" will be an invaluable self-experience as students make decisions involving trade-offs between work, personal relationships, well-being, and social impact. 

Who is your lecturer?

Teresa Spiess

 

Dr. Teresa Spieß, a professor at the department Management, Communication & IT, is engaged in the fields of Organizational Behavior & Change Management. With interests in the intersection of people and technology, her work primarily addresses the Future of Work within organizations. Her contributions to teaching have been acknowledged through the 2019 MCI Teaching Award and the 2021 Ars Docendi Recognition Award.

Language

English

Student workload

5 ECTS (including 1-2 ECTS asynchronous self-study)

Assessment

Group Work (40%), Individual Reflection (60%)

Mode

 

On-Campus: Monday till Friday during the day | synchronous (+ further teaching units asynchronous)

Date

November 11 – 22, 2024

Contents

  • The Future of Work: How work and career paths will change
  • Drivers of change: Technological advancements, social transformation and environmental dynamics
  • Crafting careers: Developing career strategies for the Future of Work, considering concepts like “meaningful work”
  • Mastering essential skills: Continuous learning, embracing change, personal branding, building networks, resilience, self-leadership and well-being
  • Harnessing personal uniqueness: Reflecting values, strengths and passions as career catalysts
  • "Crafting Your Life": A simulation where students balance work, life, and values

Learning Goals 

Upon completion of this elective course, students will be able to:

  • Explore the multiple dynamics and trends shaping the Future of Work
  • Design individual strategies for long-term career planning in a changing and challenging environment
  • Assess, build and further develop in-demand skills for work environments of the future such as continuous learning, building personal brands and networks, adaptability to change and personal resilience as well as self-leadership
  • Reflect on personal values, strengths, and passions as well as concepts like “meaningful work” and align those ideas with individual career aspirations
 

 

REGISTER HERE 

Remember, you have to choose a total of four electives!

Entrepreneurship & Innovation